Claire LeBlanc - REALTY EXECUTIVES



Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 2/12/2020


 Photo by StockSnap via Pixabay

The lawn is trimmed, the house is spotless and you're ready for a real estate agent to show off your home to a prospective buyer -- but what about your pets? Pets and showings don't always mix; the potential buyers may be afraid of or allergic to your animals -- or your pets could slip right past them and end up roaming the neighborhood. For the safety and comfort of all, confine or remove your pets during a showing in one of the following ways. 

What to do with Pets When you Show your Home

Contain them: This works best with smaller animals, like cats, petite, quiet dogs and even exotic animals like house rabbits. When they are present, but not roaming around, your pet will be safe and won't be much of a distraction. Ideally, a pet carrier or crate can be used for this purpose -- and allows your home to be shown at a moment's notice. 

Take a walk or drive: If you know when a showing is happening and will be home, then put on a leash and head to the sidewalk or car. Even a very friendly large breed dog can be alarming to some prospective buyers and any dog is a distraction. Showings don't take long, so if you can conveniently do so, taking a walk or drive gets you both out of the house and out of the way -- and ensures your home is the true focus of the visit. 

Rely on a neighbor: If you have a neighbor, friend or family member nearby that can pet sit for an afternoon, this is a good time to visit. Your pet will benefit from the attention and fresh environment and you won't have to worry about them getting out or alarming a buyer. 

Consider boarding: If your agent is holding an open house, consider boarding your pet on the big day. You won't have to worry about finding a place for them to stay and you'll be able to show the home with confidence. If you do have many people walking through the house, even a friendly pet can be overwhelmed, so this is often the best solution for all. 

Securing your pets while your home is shown will give you peace of mind about their safety and will also allow the viewers to envision themselves living there without distraction. It also gives you a chance to check all latches, doors and gates before returning your pet to their normal space -- prospective buyers could leave a door, gate or window open, allowing for an easy escape route for a curious pet. Take these simple steps before a showing and you will benefit in several key ways -- and your pets will, too. 

 




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Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 2/6/2020


6 Belknap Ter, Watertown, MA 02472

Single-Family

$639,000
Price

7
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Watertown/Newton line,COMMUTERS DREAM LOCATION! 3 bedroom Colonial with character and charm located on a cul de sac! 1st floor offers a sunny living room with fireplace,formal dining room with built in hutch, good sized sun room with French doors perfect for den, office, exercise or playroom and spacious eat in kitchen! 2nd floor has 3 good sized bedrooms and full bath! Lower level has additional finished basement space (not included in Sq Ft ) with bar, walk out, and 1/2 bath. 1 car garage, hardwood floors, carpeting upstairs, newer windows, newer oil burner! Minutes to Mass Pike, Storrow Dr/Memorial Dr, Boston,Brighton, Cambridge,Harvard Sq.! Minutes to Watertown Sq, buses, the new Arsenal Yards, shops, banks, restaurants and Charles River walk/bike path!
Open House
Sunday
February 09 at 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 6 Belknap Ter, Watertown, MA 02472    Get Directions

Similar Properties





Categories: Open House  


Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 2/5/2020

Photo by Acharaporn Kamornboonyarush from Pexels

In a nutshell, if you have owned a home for five years and lived in it for at least two out of five years, or if you’ve owned the house for two years and lived in it the entire time, a single person has a $250,000 tax exemption. If you are married, as a couple, you have a $500,000 exemption. Any gains over those amounts are taxable. You should always discuss the sale of your home with a tax attorney, especially if you used the house for business or rented it out, as you may not be able to take the exemption on homes used for business or as a rental.

Figuring the Tax

Before you can estimate how much tax you might owe, you need to calculate the cost basis for the property. Figure the tax by completing these steps:

Figure the Cost Basis

Add the price you paid for the property to the cost of any significant improvements. Subtract any casualty and theft losses, closing costs you paid when you bought the house and allowable depreciation. You might be able to subtract some closing costs. If you inherited the property, the initial investment is the fair market value on the date of the death of the person who willed the house to you.

For gifted properties, if there is a gain, you use the donor’s adjusted basis in the cost basis equation. If there is a loss, the cost basis is the fair market value on the date you received the property as a gift or the donor’s adjusted basis, whichever is less.

Figure the Capital Gain

Once you have the cost basis, subtract it from the sale price of the house. For example, if you paid $500,000 for your home and you are now selling it for $1,000,000, you have a capital gain of $500,000. If you are single, you will pay tax on $250,000. If you are married, the exclusion is $500,000, which wipes out the $500,000 profit.

Reducing the Tax Owed

You may be able to use the Section 1031 exchange if you are selling a home used for business or that was rented out as long as you buy another house for business or to rent out. The new purchase cannot be for personal use and the exchange must be for “like-kind.”

The regulations for a Section 1031 exchange are limited and may be confusing. Always retain a tax lawyer or accountant to help you with your taxes, especially if you are buying and selling an investment property. If you are selling a million dollar plus home and you use it as your personal residence, you should still contact a tax lawyer. Depending on your finances, the tax lawyer may be able to help you avoid some of the tax.




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Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 1/30/2020


6 Belknap Ter, Watertown, MA 02472

Single-Family

$639,000
Price

7
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Watertown/Newton line,COMMUTERS DREAM LOCATION! 3 bedroom Colonial with character and charm located on a cul de sac! 1st floor offers a sunny living room with fireplace,formal dining room with built in hutch, good sized sun room with French doors perfect for den, office, exercise or playroom and spacious eat in kitchen! 2nd floor has 3 good sized bedrooms and full bath! Lower level has additional finished basement space (not included in Sq Ft ) with bar, walk out, and 1/2 bath. 1 car garage, hardwood floors, carpeting upstairs, newer windows, newer oil burner! Minutes to Mass Pike, Storrow Dr/Memorial Dr, Boston,Brighton, Cambridge,Harvard Sq.! Minutes to Watertown Sq, buses, the new Arsenal Yards, shops, banks, restaurants and Charles River walk/bike path!
Open House
Sunday
February 02 at 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 6 Belknap Ter, Watertown, MA 02472    Get Directions

Similar Properties





Categories: Open House  


Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 1/29/2020

Photo by Mohamed Hassan via Pixabay

Buying and selling real estate is a complicated process that takes time. Because you are making a life decision and dealing with strangers, you should always have a valid purchase contract. Real estate agents use a standard contract, but the buyer and/or seller may make changes to that contract. In making changes, be careful not to make the contract invalid.

A Valid Contract

Four elements make up a valid contract:

  • You must have an offer. In real estate, this is the party purchasing the real property.

  • You must have consideration. This is something of value, usually cash. In real estate contracts, this is called good faith money or earnest money and is usually 1 to 3 percent of the purchase price. The good faith money is typically non-refundable should the buyer back out of the contract. The consideration shows that the contract is not a gift.

  • The other party must accept the offer in the contract. If the seller signs the contract, they accepted your offer. However, if the seller does not accept your offer, they do not sign the contract. If the seller wants to counter, this may be verbal until the two parties agree upon a number. The real estate agent drafts a new contract that both parties sign.

  • Finally, the contract must contain mutuality or what attorneys often call “a meeting of the minds.” By signing the contract, the parties agree that they understand and agree to the terms of the contract.

Components of a Real Estate Contract

A real estate contract must contain:

  • The buyers’ full names.

  • The sellers’ full names.

  • The address and legal description of the property.

  • The purchase price and how the buyer will pay it, whether cash, cash subject to a new mortgage, cash subject to an existing mortgage, cash with the assumption of the existing mortgage or sale by land contract.

  • The amount of earnest money.

  • How the buyers and sellers will handle real estate taxes, assessments and adjustments.

  • How the sellers will transfer title and that the title is free and clear.

  • Date and time of possession of the property or closing date. In most cases, this is the closing date since most people do not have the cash to buy the property without a mortgage. It generally takes 30 to 60 days for a mortgage to be approved.

  • A list of improvements and fixtures that the seller will include in the purchase price.

  • Any other general or special conditions for the sale and/or purchase of the property.

Exceptions

Most real estate contracts also have exceptions. If these terms cannot be met, the buyers’ non-refundable deposit becomes refundable. Common exceptions include an inspection meeting the buyers’ expectations and the ability of the buyer to procure financing. The parties may further negotiate the price of the real estate based on the inspection. The parties may also add any other agreed-upon exceptions.




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