Claire LeBlanc - REALTY EXECUTIVES



Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 2/12/2020


 Photo by StockSnap via Pixabay

The lawn is trimmed, the house is spotless and you're ready for a real estate agent to show off your home to a prospective buyer -- but what about your pets? Pets and showings don't always mix; the potential buyers may be afraid of or allergic to your animals -- or your pets could slip right past them and end up roaming the neighborhood. For the safety and comfort of all, confine or remove your pets during a showing in one of the following ways. 

What to do with Pets When you Show your Home

Contain them: This works best with smaller animals, like cats, petite, quiet dogs and even exotic animals like house rabbits. When they are present, but not roaming around, your pet will be safe and won't be much of a distraction. Ideally, a pet carrier or crate can be used for this purpose -- and allows your home to be shown at a moment's notice. 

Take a walk or drive: If you know when a showing is happening and will be home, then put on a leash and head to the sidewalk or car. Even a very friendly large breed dog can be alarming to some prospective buyers and any dog is a distraction. Showings don't take long, so if you can conveniently do so, taking a walk or drive gets you both out of the house and out of the way -- and ensures your home is the true focus of the visit. 

Rely on a neighbor: If you have a neighbor, friend or family member nearby that can pet sit for an afternoon, this is a good time to visit. Your pet will benefit from the attention and fresh environment and you won't have to worry about them getting out or alarming a buyer. 

Consider boarding: If your agent is holding an open house, consider boarding your pet on the big day. You won't have to worry about finding a place for them to stay and you'll be able to show the home with confidence. If you do have many people walking through the house, even a friendly pet can be overwhelmed, so this is often the best solution for all. 

Securing your pets while your home is shown will give you peace of mind about their safety and will also allow the viewers to envision themselves living there without distraction. It also gives you a chance to check all latches, doors and gates before returning your pet to their normal space -- prospective buyers could leave a door, gate or window open, allowing for an easy escape route for a curious pet. Take these simple steps before a showing and you will benefit in several key ways -- and your pets will, too. 

 




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Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 6/5/2019

So, you recently downsized your living space. You mentally prepared to adjust your lifestyle to a more compact living area, you reorganized all your belongings, implemented new storage systems and found the most effective furniture arrangements, but what about the dog? While the new living arrangement might be a little adjustment for you, it could be a more significant adjustment for your pets, especially for dogs used to a large backyard and play area. How can you help your pet make the transition? Try some of these tips. 

Design their backyard ahead of time.

Just as you investigated the best way to layout your new home to make the downsizing transition work for you, your dog will need help designing their new yard space to make the smaller area work for them. Start by separating and designating areas your dog needs as much as possible. Did your pet have a specific bathroom area in their old yard? It usually is in a corner far away from their play areas or your entertainment areas. Having a designated place to "go" is a comforting factor to your dog. It may be harder for them to find and keep a specific location in a smaller yard without infringing on their play area. Before bringing your dog into the new yard take a look at the space and figure out the best place for their house, potty area and play areas. Try keeping their home and the potty regions in opposite corners with a corridor, or the most extended angled area you can find, available for play. When you first introduce your pup to the yard walk them around the perimeter, introduce them to their house, and get them to mark in their new bathroom corner. You should do this daily for at least a couple weeks to help ingrain the different areas and help them separate the spaces in their yard.

Keep your dog entertained. 

If you have an outdoor dog that is used to a large yard, particularly if you have a larger breed, you may find that they are having trouble adjusting to a small yard. While they used to be able to occupy your time at work with chasing birds or squirrels and generally running around, they now have less natural entertainment in the small condo or bungalow yard. When you come home from work, do they seem bored? Are they very antsy? Are they tearing up your new yard looking for something to do? Depending on your pet's play preferences - chewing, tugging, digging - there are simple DIY backyard projects you can tackle to provide more independent play activities for your dog.

  • Tug of War - Installing an independent tug toy is a very effective entertainment source for your dog. You can DIY this set up using a fence or stair railing post, or by planting a large stake in the yard. Grab a short bungee cord and a long piece of thick rope from your local hardware store. Tie several large and tight knots at the end of the rope, then tie the rope around the center of the bungee cord. Wrap the cord tight around the post several times until it has no flex when hooked together. If you donít have a post available invest in a long metal stake that you can secure in the ground, then use a medium size carabiner to clip the rope toy to the post. Introduce the toy to your dog and entertain them for hours.
  • Digging Area - If your dog likes to dig but can quickly dig up your entire new yard, try establishing a specific digging area for him. Take another corner of your yard, or a place along the side yard if you have one and dig out a small pit. Fill the hole with heavier sand or mulch to make it easier for your dog to dig. Convince them the new pit is the right place to dig by burring a bone, their favorite toy or a treat and show them they can dig to find it. Continue establishing the spot with your dog over the first few weeks, and they'll soon be burying their bone there themselves and have a new independent play option.

Maintain the yard. 

Work to keep your yard space clean and usableófor you and the dog. You may not have had to pick up poop daily on your larger property. It is now imperative to keep the bathroom area clean and contained. And, maintain as much usable space in the yard as possible. If you host a bbq make sure you clean up and restore any furniture that encroaches on your dogís play area.

If you have a large dog who needs a bigger outdoor space, make sure you take up this concern with your real estate agent while you look for your new home, so they can help you find the best option for downsizing that keeps you and your pup happy. For even more life enjoyment expand your pup's living space with indoor activities as well. Spending time with you in your space is also good for the dog's stimulation. See part two of this article for tips on entertaining your pet indoors.




Tags: pets   backyard   family pets  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Claire LeBlanc on 7/2/2014

Staging your home for potential buyers can be quite the hassle. You may start moving your furniture around spontaneously, or become tense when your children or spouse make messes in a room that you just prepped for show. With all of the planning that one can put into making their home shine, one crucial step in home staging is often overlooked: your family pet. For the sake of simplicity, I will outline a few things that you must keep in mind when cleaning up after your pet in a home for sale. Pet presence - For obvious reasons, some pets can't leave the house. Giant enclosures, aquariums, and disabled pets are hard to relocate sometimes, and a lot of people will be understanding of this. But if your dog or cat is healthy, then you'll want to strongly consider relocating your pets temporarily. Many people aren't pet owners, and don't like being around an excitable golden retriever or a yippy chihuahua when they are trying to imagine their family occupying your home. Remember....You are trying to make the potential buyer as relaxed as possible. Ask a friend if they wouldn't mind looking after your loved one for a bit, and if all else fails, look into a reputable boarding service for your pet. Fur - Fur can get everywhere. Even in places that you, as a resident of your home, don't necessarily notice all of the time. Be sure to give your couches, chairs, and love seats proper attention. That means taking the pillows and cushions off, and using a hand vacuum or brush to remove all of the fur you see. After you are sure that they are thoroughly cleaned, use a fabric freshener to finish it off. Try to do this well in advance of the potential buyer, as some people have sensitivities to fabric fresheners. Litter - No matter what kind of animal you have, odds are you have do deal with some form of waste. It may sound pretty obvious, but make sure your litter beds are clean and well hidden. Even if you own an exotic pet like a reptile of amphibian, this includes you too. Many people don't like snakes, but they'll like a messy snake cage even less. Another important thing to remember as an exotic pet owner is this: even though you may not be able to smell anything offensive coming from your reptile's cage, that doesn't mean that there isn't an odor. Many people who live with reptiles get used to the subtle odors that emit from the cages, and will tend to spot-clean their animal's cage without giving it the proper scrub-down that it needs. Odors - Don't use air fresheners to mask pet odor. It is meant to freshen the air...Not cover pet odors up. Instead, use powdered cleaners on carpets and rugs that your pets frequent. These can be purchased at your local pet store in the cleaning isle. Odds are, if someone has a severe allergy to animals, then they are going to be at risk of having a reaction. The cleaner the house, the less dander will be in the home.







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